Book Review: Slow Regard Of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss

The Slow Regard of Silent Things

Genre: Fantasy
Series: The Kingkiller Chronicle
Author Info: http://www.patrickrothfuss.com/

Review for the first book
Review for the second book

This is a little novella, showing us a week of Auri’s live in the Underthing along with her strange relationship with nooks and crevices of it and the inanimate objects there. I got a bit bored after fifty pages but I was able to finish the book. I must say it took me half the time it took to read the monstrous 1000 page The Wise Man’s Fear, and this book is not even 100 pages. This is not to say it’s bad, it’s just not an action packed page turner.

The most action we see is Auri making soaps and a candle. There isn’t even a need to give a spoiler warning at this point, since it’s not about what happens and what’s in the book, but rather how it’s told. Rothfuss writes beautiful and poetic prose and I think no one is going to disagree with me about that. This story is not for everyone, however. It is different, it breaks every writing rule out there, yet it’s something I really enjoyed reading, although like I said it got boring in some parts.

I also got annoyed with Auri’s immense OCD and I am curious how she got so cracked in the head. I can’t help but feel sad for her. I’m a bit OCD myself, but gods, she went off the deep end for sure. The author’s words in the end by Rothfuss explains the birth of this story and how he decided to publish it, and that is quite touching and inspiring for an author. I was having issues about breaking a few writing rules in my own book but I felt much more confident after reading that part. So, I have to recommend this book to all aspiring authors, not only for the story itself but also the priceless wisdom Rothfuss was kind enough to share in the end of it.

In the end of the day, it’s a nice little book to read. It doesn’t progress Kvothe’s storyline, but it shows a glimpse of the Underthing and you get to see inside Auri’s head and her feelings for Kvothe.

Rating: 4/5 Roman Solidus

solidussolidussolidussolidus

Book Review: The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss

The Wise Man's Fear

Genre: Fantasy
Series: The Kingkiller Chronicle
Author Info: http://www.patrickrothfuss.com/

Warning: Might contain mild spoilers.
Review for the first book

I must say this book is even better than The Name of The Wind. The stories are much more exciting to read, the adventures are absolutely thrilling and we get to learn more about Kvothe and the other characters. I am particularly happy that I got to read more of Elodin. Dear Patrick Rothfuss, please put more Elodin parts in Doors of Stone. (Confession moment: I have a crush on Elodin…)

Auri is my other favorite character, and I’m happy to see more scenes of her too. Her dialogues with Kvothe made me warm and fuzzy inside. Such a sweet and likeable character.

I must add that the university scenes in this book are even better than those in The Name of the Wind. I was quite excited about Kvothe’s adventures in Ademre after seeing the mention of them in some reviews, but those parts disappointed me, except for exploring the alien culture parts. Generally speaking, I found the Ademre chapters sort of boring. Not awfully boring, but not exciting, either. I was very happy when Kvothe finally got out of there.

I felt like strangling Denna more than once, but I am quite happy about Kvothe’s love life. Saying anything more would spoil it, thus I can’t go into the details. Denna still sucks, but there is some justice at last, this is all I can say.

Kvothe’s adventures in Vintas were the best. I loved the court politics, the subplots and the chess game sort of dialogues. I really have a thing for mental chess games between sharp witted characters.

There were quite a few awesome quotes in this book, and a lot of wisdom. I should print out some of those and them on the fridge door. The tales by the campfire during the travels were really good. I really like the stories characters tell, Rothfuss masterfully weaves all the lore and myths into the main story by using these storytelling dialogues.

Verdict: Buy it! I will re-read this after I’m done with my TBR stack.

Rating: 4.5/5 Roman Solidus

solidussolidussolidussolidussolidus

Book Review: The Name of The Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

The Name of the Wind

Genre: Fantasy
Series: The Kingkiller Chronicle
Author Info: http://www.patrickrothfuss.com/

This book has been in my TBR pile for months and I’m glad to move it to the top of the pile and read it. The name of Wind is twice the usual length of a standard novel with its 695 pages, but it’s an easy read, packed with action and adventures.

The Name of the Wind is about the earlier life of the main character Kvothe. The world building is extremely detailed with the legends, customs, religion and culture. However, this book has no plot. You didn’t hear me wrong: There is no plot! There are many subplots, stories, adventures, but no main plot, yet it’s still a great book and I actually noticed the lack of the plot when I was past page 600.

Kvothe is a complex character, quite a likable fellow.Not the type I’d swoon over and fangirl about, but I loved him like a brother. There were several instances where I wanted to slap him real hard, though, which means he’s extremely realistic. Some bloggers stated that Kvothe’s time at the university sounded like Harry Potter, but I must disagree with that. It’s nothing like Harry Potter at all. I really didn’t see any parallels there. The system of magic is quite well thought and designed like science. It’s quite different from the usual magic systems you see in role playing games and the books based on or inspired by them. It’s original, different and kind of reminds me of the actual occult systems and alchemy lore. The University sounds like the mystery schools of ancient Egypt and the school of Alexandria, not like Harry Potter’s Hogwarts.

Some of the professors are quite notable characters. There was not much explanation about the mysterious Chandrian and the fae, so I am waiting to find out more about them in the second book. My favorite parts in The Name of the Wind were Kvothe’s dialogs with elusive Auri. The dialogs in those scenes are perhaps the best of all. I didn’t think it was possible to write a great fantasy book without a dark lord type adversary and a main plot, but The Name of the Wind proves me wrong. It’s an excellent story, or collection of stories and adventures, and the proof that you don’t need a big bad villain or a main plot to make it a great book. Patrick Rothfuss did a truly impressive job here.

I highly recommend all fantasy and magic lovers to read this book. It takes you to a very different, fairy tale-ish world you don’t want to ever leave.

Rating: 4.5/5 Roman Solidus

solidussolidussolidussolidussolidus